You Will Remember Me

You Will Remember Me

BY François Archambault

TRANSLATED BY Bobby Theodore

A co-production with Tarragon Theatre

Mar 1, 2016 – Apr 10, 2016
Tarragon Theatre Mainspace
30 Bridgman Avenue, Toronto
Toronto premiere

Dora Award Nomination: OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCE (R.H. Thomson)

How will you be remembered? How will you choose to remember those you love? As the aging patriarch of a modern family – a university professor, political and intellectual force, and long-time sovereigntist – suffers from dementia, the people who love him struggle to make room in their lives for his care. Studio 180 Theatre and Tarragon Theatre presented the Toronto premiere of this vivid and elegant drama about family and memory from one of Québec’s most dynamic voices: Governor General’s Award–winning playwright François Archambault.

Tu te souviendras de moi (You Will Remember Me) was created at Théâtre de la Licorne in 2014. In 2014, the play was among the Governor General’s Literary Award contenders, and received the prestigious Michel-Tremblay Award.

DIRECTED BY Joel Greenberg
FEATURING Michela Cannon, Mark McGrinder, Nancy Palk, Kimwun Perehinec, R.H. Thomson
SET, COSTUME & PROJECTION DESIGN Denyse Karn
LIGHTING DESIGN Kimberly Purtell
SOUND DESIGN Verne Good
STAGE MANAGER Laura Baxter
APPRENTICE STAGE MANAGER Bradley Dunn
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR Viktor Lukawski


Spratling Dotsa Bitove Wellness Academy Untitled-16

Lobby Exhibit – “Party at the Vatican”

“Party at the Vatican” is an exhibition of paintings and drawings made by Dotsa Bitove Wellness Academy members. Exploring their different interests through various methods, these artists find a common ground in their shared understanding in art’s meaning and value. The Dotsa Bitove Wellness Academy is a place of learning for persons with dementia, their families and care partners. They are a centre for excellence in research and relational care and affiliated with York University and University Health Network (UHN). Learn more…


Tarragon Lecture

During the run of each show, Tarragon invites great minds to further thinking on the show’s subject matter through pre-show lectures. The lecture inspired by You Will Remember Me took place on Saturday, March 12, 2016, as Katie Doran – Public Education Coordinator at Alzheimer Society Toronto – discussed aspects of memory relevant to the play.



Season Sponsor 2015/16


BMO Financial Group

Reviews from Studio 180’s production

“Frustration, impatience, anger, tenderness, patience and love are emotions that simmer in this production. The result is subtly gripping. You ache for every character… François Archambault has written an exquisitely poetic play about a frightening subject. Bobby Theodore’s translation is equally exquisite. The words shimmer in the air. The familiarity of the lousy subject pierces the heart… A beautiful play about so many important issues. Don’t ever forget that and remember to see it soon.”
SLOTKIN LETTER

“A complex work of art – funny and moving… Palk and Thomson give performances to treasure… Part (modern) family drama, part state of the (Québec) nation play, You Will Remember Me both explores the reality of dementia and uses it as metaphor, one that keeps subtly shifting.”
★★★.5 (out of 4) – GLOBE AND MAIL

“You won’t soon forget R.H. Thomson’s brilliant performance… a showcase for a terrific seasoned actor.”
NNNN – NOW MAGAZINE

“Archambault’s script runs the gamut from heart-wrenching to heart-warming… Don’t miss this timely meditation on memory and loss in the digital age.”
★★★★ (out of five) – THEATROMANIA

“Richly written, thematically resonant, and well-constructed. It’s also funny, emotionally stunning, and deeply moving… The writing soars.”
MOONEY ON THEATRE

“At times funny and others heartbreakingly raw… It’s a must-see for anyone who’s ever been touched by dementia in a loved one, or who yearns for an unapologetically honest dialogue about the challenges those who face it endure.”
EVERYTHING ZOOMER

“An extraordinary play with a superb cast giving outstanding performances. Joel Greenberg’s directing shows sensitivity and subtlety.”
JAMES KARAS REVIEWS